Generous donors fund institute’s summer interns

TaubmanSummerInternsPhilanthropy fuels the Taubman Institute’s mission of funding talented, proven clinician-scientists at U-M, and their promising junior counterparts, through grant programs that support these physicians’ laboratory research.

And now, generous donors have made it possible to teach and encourage the medical science leaders of tomorrow.  Michigan philanthropists Joel and Shelley Tauber, longtime U-M supporters and members of the Taubman Institute’s Leadership Advisory Board, are the benefactors of the institute’s newest initiative, the Tauber Family Student Internship Program.

This five-year financial commitment will finance three student internships each year, allowing undergraduate students to work within the laboratories of Taubman Scholars or Emerging Scholars.  It’s hoped that the exposure to cutting-edge translational medical research will encourage these budding scientists to choose a lifetime of striving to bring new cures and treatments to patients with difficult diseases.

“When young, imagining a future for oneself can be overwhelming,” the Taubers said.  “We want to be part of inspiring young people to pursue a future in medical research by exposing them to Michigan’s scientific environment.

“Our goal is to enable interested and qualified young students to be part of teams that are focused on understanding and advancing medicine and its ability to treat disease.”

For 2013, three students will assist in the Program for Neurology Research & Discovery, the laboratory of Taubman Institute Director Dr. Eva Feldman.  They are:

  • Anna Bakeman, a student at the Medical College of Wisconsin
  • Rebecca Glasser, a student at Harvard University
  • Sangri Kim, a student at Johns Hopkins University

All of the interns will have an opportunity to work on projects ranging from stem cell derivation to the analysis of skin samples taken from neurology patients.

Rebecca Glasser, a West Bloomfield, Mich. native and a sophomore studying molecular and cellular biology at Harvard, says the internship meshes with her career aspiration to work as a clinician-scientist.

Working in the lab is a manifestation of everything I’ve learned in school,” she said.  “It’s great to actually see how everything comes together in the lab, rather than just in a textbook.  It’s really given me perspective on what I want to do.